Tag Archives: Bangalore

365 Places: Wedding at Bangalore Palace

Day 180: Wedding at Bangalore Palace, Bangalore, India

Today my post features some images and a video of an Indian wedding we saw at the Bangalore Palace.

It was so colourful and noisy – had it share!

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365 Places: Bangalore Palace

Day 179: Bangalore Palace, India

Today we started our fabulous South Indian Mystery tour, curated by our dear friend and artist Di Ball. Our first destination was Bangalore Palace and we were very lucky that there was a wedding on when we visiting. Mr Wikipedia has this potted history:

Bengaluru Palace, a palace located in Bengaluru, India, was built by Rev. Garrett, who was the first Principal of the Central High School in Bangalore, now known as Central College.

The construction of the palace was started in 1862 and completed in 1944. In 1884, it was bought by the then Maharaja of Mysore HH Chamarajendra Wadiyar X. Now owned by the Mysore royal family, the palace has recently undergone a renovation.

The palace is full of very interesting (albeit questionable) objects and well as having beautiful architectural features. It is not a cheap place to visit by Indian standards – 440 Rupees for foreigners and you have to pay extra to take a camera or smart phone for pictures. It was worth it though to have a glimpse into Royal life in Bangalore.

Here are some of my photos.

10 Tips for catching an autorickshaw in Bangalore

Catching an autorickshaw for the first time can be quite scary, but is a cost effective alternative to taxis and is great fun if you are prepared for a lot of noise, traffic chaos and the challenge of trying to communicate with local drivers with very limited English. Here are a few tips that may help to make your first autorickshaw journey a pleasant experience:

Autorickshaw
Autorickshaw © Martin Drury 2014
  1. Make a mud map. Just on a piece of scrap paper make a rough map of the destination, you can hand this over to the driver. It doesn’t matter too much if he doesn’t hand it back or you loose it.
  2. Record the destination address accurately, make sure that you include the suburb or area name. If the driver doesn’t know the area that well they can always pull over and ask for further directions from a local shop keeper when they get there.
  3. Record the phone number of your destination. If possible write down the phone number of the destination so that if the driver gets lost you can ring up and ask for directions.
  4. Record major landmarks. On your mud map record any major landmarks or major cross streets close to your destination if you happen to know of any
  5. Ask a local, who uses autorickshaws on a regular basis, what they would expect to pay to go to your destination. This gives you a rough idea of what to expect as a fair deal.
  6. Agree a price beforehand, or insist that they use the meter. Autorickshaws are equipped with a meter but are not always used. If you have a rough idea of a fair price, or of what you are prepared to pay you can agree on a price before you accept the ride. However an agreed price will usually be more than the metered price, unless you are an exceptional negotiator. If you are after the cheapest option insist that they use the meter.
  7. Track the route. If you have a smart phone it is useful to track your progress to maake sure that you are heading in the right direction.
  8. Do not hand over your phone. Unless you really trust the driver, it is best not to hand over your phone as you may not get it back.
  9. Flag down a driver rather than picking one from the queue, if you choose an autorickshaw from the roadside queue (the equivalent of a taxi rank) it seems that you are charged an extra fee for the time that they spend waiting in the queue.
  10. Keep your stuff secure, hang on tight to your personal belongings as it is easy for a passing motorcyclist or pedestrian to reach in and grap what they want.

Hang on and enjoy the ride!

365 Places: Bangalore

Day 69: Bangalore, India

Today’s post is another puzzle piece that connects to our dream to travel to India. Earlier this week I was at the KM Australia conference and met someone from Bangalore who works for Oracle. Then today, I saw a conference that looked really interesting, also in Bangalore – so now I am curious and want to visit.

Bangalore is the third largest city in India and also boasts a pleasant year round climate. It has a fascinating history and was once called the “Garden City of India” and the “Pensioner’s Paradise”. These labels no longer apply to Bangalore, as it now a large, cosmopolitan city with diminishing green spaces and a large working population. Bangalore is the major center of India’s IT industry, popularly known as the Silicon Valley of India. The earliest records of a place named ‘Bengaluru’ are found in a 9th century temple in an area that is now known as ‘Old Bangalore’.

UB City, Photo Credit: Sanyambahga
UB City, Photo Credit: Sanyambahga

I am drawn to Bangalore because it is a hub for companies and people working with technology – I am very interested to learn about this aspect of Bangalore, particularly to find out what sort of media arts community might be there. I also understand there are some beautiful lakes around Bangalore and lots of temples to visit.

Suggested places to visit
I will try to include other peoples suggestions of good places to visit in our posts – here is one: No 1 shanthi road gallery/studio